Government regulation of the pesticide ethylene dibromide (EDB)
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Government regulation of the pesticide ethylene dibromide (EDB) joint hearings before certain subcommittees of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-eighth Congress, second session, March 5 and 6, 1984. by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Government Operations.

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Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Ethylene dibromide.,
  • Ethylene dibromide -- Toxicology.,
  • Pesticide residues in food -- United States.,
  • Pesticides -- Law and legislation -- United States.

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsKF27 .G6 1984
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 1403 p. :
Number of Pages1403
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3001399M
LC Control Number84603979

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Ethylene dibromide is a heavy, colorless liquid with a mildly sweet, chloroform odor. The chemical is light-sensitive and reacts with metals, oxidizing materials, and alkalis. EDB is both a halogenated hydrocarbon and a brominated alkane. Exposure Guidelines. Ethylene Dibromide (Dibromoethane) Hazard Summary Exposure to ethylene dibromide primarily occurs from its past use as an additive to leaded gasoline and as a fumigant. Ethylene dibromide is extremely toxic to humans. The chronic (long-term) effects of exposure to ethylene dibromide have not been well documented in humans. Committee on Government Operations. Title(s): Government regulation of the pesticide ethylene dibromide (EDB): joint hearings before certain subcommittees of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-eighth Congress, second session, March 5 and 6, Ethylene dibromide (EDB) is a heavy, colourless liquid with a mild, sweet odour that readily volatilises to form toxic vapour concentrations in air. It was used in Australia mainly as an agricultural soil fumigant. Other names for EDB include 1,2-dibromoethane, ethylene bromide, and glycol dibromide.

Ethylene dibromide (EDB) is the common name of an insecticide which has been sold under the discontinued trade names of Soilbrom, Dowfume, Bromofume, KopFume, and Nephis. EDB was registered for use in , in , EPA canceled all agricultural uses of the chemical. 2,4-D - Identification, toxicity, use, water pollution potential, ecological toxicity and regulatory information Note: See Working with the Information on this Page section below for important notes about this data. 1,2-Dibromoethane is a manufactured chemical. It also occurs naturally in small amounts in the ocean where it is formed, probably by algae and kelp. It is a colorless liquid with a mild, sweet odor. Other names for 1,2-dibromoethane are ethylene dibromide, EDB, and glycol bromide. 1,2-Dibromoethane, also known as ethylene dibromide (EDB), is an organobromine compound with the chemical formula C 2 H 4 Br gh trace amounts occur naturally in the ocean, where it is formed probably by algae and kelp, it is mainly is a dense colorless liquid with a faint sweet odor, detectable at 10 ppm, is a widely used and sometimes-controversial iations: EDB.

Penelope A. Fenner-Crisp, in Hayes' Handbook of Pesticide Toxicology (Third Edition), Introduction. In the United States, primary authority for pesticide regulation resides with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). Public Notices Related to this Chemical. Priority List for the Development of Proposition 65 NSRLs for Carcinogens and MADLs for Chemicals Causing Reproductive Toxicity. Diquat was applied in doses of 0, , , , & ug/ml diquat cation. The concn of diquat initially followed an exponential decline; after day 3 the decline in concn in the 3 highest treatments was less precipitous. By day 5, diquat was below the min detectable level of ug/ml in all treatments. Half-lives were as follows: , , & days for treatments of , , & EDB; Ethylene dibromide; Ethylene bromide. Occurence(s)/Use(s) Pesticide for felled logs and beehives; chemical intermediate for dyes, resins, waxes, and gums. Former pesticide and ingredient of soil and grain fumigant formulations until these uses were banned in the US in